create a graph of your own. You could use data for a different country, or for an individual state within the U.S. You could chart new confirmed cases or new fatal cases.

Check the attached word document

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Coronavirus in U.S.

The chart in the Covid-19 Tracker is discouraging visually, because it keeps going up. This impression is a bit misleading, though, because it is charting only total confirmed cases. Total confirmed cases, of course, can only go up over time.

Some other charts might be more useful to spot when we reach the peak of the outbreak. For example, the chart below shows the number of new confirmed cases in the U.S. for the first 2 weeks in April. It appears to show a peak was reached on April 10.

To create this chart, I put the cursor on the spread over time chart in the Covid-19 Tracker. Up pops the total number of confirmed cases for that day. I wrote down the day and the number of confirmed cases. Repeated this for the first 14 days in April to create a time series of total confirmed cases. Subtracted the total for April 13 from the total for April 14 to get the number of new cases on April 14. Repeated this for the rest of the days to get a time series of new cases. The line graph of this time series is what is shown above.

For extra credit, create a graph of your own. You could use data for a different country, or for an individual state within the U.S. You could chart new confirmed cases or new fatal cases.

If you want to track changes in active cases or recovered cases, you will have to go to something other than the Covid-19 Tracker – since you can’t pull a time series of active or recovered cases from the Tracker in the same way you can pull a time series for confirmed cases and fatal cases.

You could even chart how the death rate (fatal cases / confirmed cases) has changed over time. Be creative.